Laughter is Social Glue

– After Ritu Khanduri, With apologies Laughter is social glue— When it escapes the blow is softened— The Brits did not know about Laughter Out of Place, said They, Those brown people, have no sense of fun, only satire and malice—Why can they not be happy we’ve won?   Laughter is social glue— It cements […]

Zika and Microcephaly: Can We Learn from History?

Brazil is facing an epidemic of a severe birth defect: microcephaly (abnormally small head size), a condition linked with important neurological impairments and developmental delays. Not all children born with an abnormally small circumference of the head suffer from these problems, but many do. The microcephaly epidemic has been linked to an infection with the […]

Children on the Border: Could Migration be the Problem, Not the Solution?

Youth gang recruits in Guatemala and elsewhere in Central America are at risk at home, during migration, and even once they reach the U.S. Photo courtesy of USAID Can a border crisis originate in nurseries? More and more Americans are hiring women from Central America to raise their children. More often than not, the women […]

Rasanblaj Continua: A Conversation with Gina Athena Ulysse

This past summer marked the release of Caribbean Rasanblaj, a special double issue of the Hemispheric Institute’s journal, e-misférica. Our social media team at Anthropology Now was proud to spread the word about this unique online resource, which is available to all at: Hemispheric Institute’s journal, e-misférica In this web-exclusive discussion for Anthropology Now, Andrea Queeley interviews the project’s […]

Haiti Photography Project: a quick seven day experiment

Technology for development projects (T4D) typically import expensive and unsustainable equipment when trying to improve a situation.  The one laptop per child project is an example of a typical T4D kind of initiative.  Although its laptops are, for the world of laptops, inexpensive, their cost is still prohibitive in the places where they are deployed. […]

Jamaica: A Queer Place

The dump in Riverton has started burning again. A stinking heap of tires, plastic, chemicals, and other run-off, piled high as if an altar to the consumptive labors of residents of Kingston and its surrounding parishes, has confounded slack-handed and resourced-challenged responses to this now familiar but more ferocious blaze sending children to hospital, forcing […]

Burying Minority Istanbul: Last Glimpses of the Cosmopolitan City

April 24, 2015 marks the 100th anniversary of the Armenian Genocide of 1915 at the hands of the Ottoman Empire in what is current-day Turkey. Anthropology Now is pleased to share this piece on contemporary Turkey and reflections on the genocide by journalist Mary D’Ambrosio. We’d disturbed them at dinner, and they leapt up in […]

Fighting an Invisible Enemy in Liberia: the Use of Popular Culture Against Ebola

“I want to do it my way – I wish I had my own way,” sings Takun J., Liberia’s own superstar.  Today he performs at an “Anti-Ebola-stigmatization event” at 146, a bar in downtown Monrovia. Together with other artists Nasiman, Butterfly, Peaches and Skeet, he begs Liberia not to discriminate against Ebola survivors. The event, […]

Riots, Rage and Populism: Voices from the Austere City

Pope Francis for President. It’s the latest provocation of Italian comedy sketches, but it generates bitter laughter. It speaks to the burgeoning lack of trust not only in traditional politicians, but also in political parties, mechanisms and institutions. It signals despair and disillusionment. There is reason to be concerned. Muhammad Shahzad Khan, a Pakistani resident, […]

Recalled to Life: On the Meaning and Power of a Die-In

Die-in at the 2014 annual meeting of the American Anthropological Association. Photo credit: Aries Dela CruzI have never died before. In the beginning of December, at the annual meeting of the American Anthropological Association in Washington, D.C., I made my way down to our hotel’s main lobby with a few of my friends, to join […]